Brewed an IPA and Rob’s Belgian Dubbel- Batches 50 and 51

So, last night my friend Rob came over and we brewed two beers.  (Note to self:  Brewing two beers on a Friday night is a bit much- do it on a Saturday next time.)

Centennial Hops for the IPA

Centennial Hops for the IPA

We started with the IPA, thinking it would be the easier of the two recipes.  Here’s the recipe we used (inspired by Sam Calagione.)

Preboil tea:
4-1/2 gallons (17 L) water
1 pound (455 g) 60 Lovibond Crystal malt
2 teaspoons (28 g) gypsum
Boil:
8 pounds (3.6 kg) pale liquid malt extract (65 minutes)
1-1/2 ounces (43 g) Centennial hops (bittering) (60 minutes)
1 teaspoon (5 g) Irish Moss
1 ounce (28 g) Cascade hops (flavoring) ( 10 minutes)
1/2 ounce (15 g) Cascade hops (aroma) (End of boil)
Fermentation:
Yeast: Wyeast 1272
1/2 pound (225 g) light brown sugar (Day 2)
Dry Hop:
1 ounce (28 g) Cascade hops (Days 5-7)

Oh, by the way, we DOUBLED both recipes!

So, we got the crystal malts all nice and pretty and mashed, strained the grains out, then started the boil.  Added the 16lbs of liquid malt extract, and then the first hop addition- 3oz of Centennial hops.

 

Hop on Pop? No. Hops in pot.

Hop on Pop? No. Hops in pot.

We boiled for 50 minutes, added 2oz Cascades and some whirlfloc tablets, waited 10 minutes then added 1oz of Cascades.  Strained the hops out, then poured it equally into our fermenters.  Beer 1 done, on to beer #2.

Rob’s Belgian Dubbel

3.3lb Briess Pilsen Light LME
1lb 2oz Pilsner Malt (German Pilsner )
2.25 Aromatic Malt (or German Melanoidin)
1lb 7oz crystal malt (20L)
2.25lb Briess Special Roast Malt (50L) (Domestic “Special Roast” Malt)
2.66lb corn sugar
1.25oz Fuggles hops (60 min)
.33oz Fuggles hops (0 min)
.25oz (7.1g) Curacao orange peel
.5oz (14g) Licorice root
Wyeast 1214 Belgian Ale yeast
1.2 cups corn sugar for priming

We did the grain tea on this one, slowly brought the temp up to 168 degrees over a 30 minute period, then sparged the grains.  Well, at least that was the theory.  The temp didn’t cooperate terribly well with us, but we got it close enough.

Adding grains to pot

Adding grains to pot

We took the grain tea we made, added corn sugar, and began the boil.

Getting temperature on grains

Getting temperature on grains

The hop schedule is pretty simple.  Fuggles at the beginning and fuggles at the end.  The original recipe called for Styrian Goldings, but Steinbarts was out of Goldings.

With 15 minutes remaining in the boil, we added the orange peel, licorice root, and light malt extract.  Finished the boil, added the last fuggles, strained the beer and put it in the fermenters.

Now, I’m waiting for Rob to bring the yeast by so I can pitch it.  I also need to pick up a new hydrometer, as Greggory broke my last one.  Will record initial gravity soon.

Note:  Initial gravity on the IPA was 1.070.  The Dubbel was 1.066.  Both going to be big beers.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.brettgorley.com/blog/?p=861

Tragor’s Brown Ale- Bottled- Batch 49

Oooh, baby!  Got this thing bottled tonight.  Also got to use my new Christmas present!

Bottling Tree

Bottling Tree

The top part is called an avvinator.  You fill the bowl up with sanitizing solution, use the pump to spray sanitizer into bottles, then hang them on the bottling tree.  Worked great.

Bottle Tree with Bottles

Bottle Tree with Bottles

So, while the kids were doing the bottles, I was sanitizing my bottling bucket.  Then I transferred the beer to the bottling bucket.  Was going to take the final gravity, but my son Greggory in his zeal to help daddy dropped my hydrometer on the floor and broke it.  Grrrrr……  Well, no alcohol content for this beer.  Plus I’m out $7.  Second one I broke to date.

Ended the evening with 45 small bottles and 3 22oz bottles.  Should be ready for our family party next weekend.

Tragor's Brown Ale

Tragor's Brown Ale

Permanent link to this article: http://www.brettgorley.com/blog/?p=852

Tragor’s Brown Ale- Batch 49

Christmas Eve.  That time of year when the kids are getting antsy with anticipation.  A feast is being prepared.  Candy is out.  The tree is lit.  There is a festive warmth to the air.  What better time to brew some beer?

Tragor’s Brown Ale, as I am calling this one.  I did have a bit of inspiration with this, though….

Papazian Brown Ale Recipe

Papazian Brown Ale Recipe

I modified the recipe to the following.

7lbs dark malt extract syrup
1/2lb 60L crystal malt
1/4lb black patent malt
2oz Fuggles (boiling)
1/4oz Cascades (finishing)
4tsp Gypsum
English Ale yeast (Wyeast WLP002)

Used a grain bag on the grains, held at 150 degrees for 30 minutes.  Discarded grains, added dark malt extract and brought to a boil.  Normally I wait till it’s boiling before adding the malt.  This time I added it before the boil to prevent it from burning and sticking to the bottom of the pot.  It worked, I had an easy clean up of the pot when I was done.  I bought whole leaf Fuggles for the boil and boiled away.  Added my Cascade pellets with 10 minutes remaining.

Grain Bag

Grain Bag

Brown Ale Wort boiling

Brown Ale Wort boiling

Once done I strained out the hop leaves and poured the lot into my fermenter and topped it off to 5 gallons.  Pitched the yeast Christmas day eve; initial gravity was 1.052.  Should be a nice 5 to 5.25% alcohol by volume.  Tastes yummy so far.  Going to be a good beer.

Brown ale in fermenter

Brown ale in fermenter

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.brettgorley.com/blog/?p=845

Network and Server Monitoring tools

Been researching this topic recently.  Found a great resource to assist me with finding something to monitor my servers:

http://www.networkworld.com/slideshows/2011/100411-open-source-management-software.html

Numerous tools on this page.  Will begin documenting and testing.  If you have a favorite tool, leave me a comment!

Permanent link to this article: http://www.brettgorley.com/blog/?p=842

Why RAID 5 Stops Working

I was tasked a while ago with rebuilding our home made NAS server.  Given my options, I went with a RAID-6 config.  Why?  Here’s why:

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/storage/why-raid-5-stops-working-in-2009/162

RAID 6 is the way to go these days.  Minimum.  And thankfully we did, as one of the hard drives went bad within a month.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.brettgorley.com/blog/?p=838

Bottled My Stout and Pumpkin Ale- Batches 47 and 48

So, last night I was able to bottle both batches of beer.  Doing it by myself sure takes some time!

The Pumpkin Ale is a bit weak in the pumpkin realm.  It could really use more pumpkin presence.  Guess that’s what I get for using a cheap pumpkin and not shopping around for the best pie pumpkin.

On the other hand, the chocolate stout is amazing!  Rich, dark, full bodied and just a hint of dark chocolate flavor.  Ooohhh, yeah!  Gonna be a good winter with this beer on hand.

Final gravity for the pumpkin ale was 1.012, giving me a grand total alcohol by volume of 6.8%.  Hmm…. that seems a bit high, especially for as little fermentation as I saw.  Final on my stout was 1.016, for an alcohol by volume of 5%.  This is wrong.  I may have switched the initial gravities of the two.

Switching the initial gravities, I come up with the pumpkin ale being 5.5% alcohol, and the stout being 6.3%.  I think I’m sticking with these figures.  Next time I need to write down my initial gravities IMMEDIATELY, and not wait a day or two.

Chocolate Stout Beer Label

Chocolate Stout Beer Label

 

Pumpkin Ale Beer Label

Pumpkin Ale Beer Label

 

Permanent link to this article: http://www.brettgorley.com/blog/?p=833

Chocolate Stout and Pumpkin Beer- Batches 47 and 48

Saturday was a big day for me.  Not only did I bottle my Weizen, but I also brewed two batches of beer with help from my friend Rob!

Rob Morrison doesn't like his picture taken. Can you tell?

Rob Morrison doesn't like his picture taken. He's not giving me the peace sign.

So, we started with the Chocolate Stout.  Here is the recipe I followed (based off of Rogue’s Chocolate Stout):

1.5lb two row
7lbs liquid extract
.5lbs 120L crystal malt
.5lbs chocolate malt
.5lbs rolled oats
3oz roasted barley
1.5oz chocolate extract (in secondary)
1oz Cascade (90 min)
1oz Cascade (60 min)
1oz Cascade (30 min
1oz cascade (0 min)
1 tsp Irish Moss Continue reading

Permanent link to this article: http://www.brettgorley.com/blog/?p=813

Bottled my Weizen- Batch 46

Had a big beer day yesterday.  Finally got around to bottling my wheat beer.  Used mostly 22oz bottles to bottle it.

Wheat Beer Bottling

Wheat Beer Bottling

Since I had no initial gravity, I didn’t take the final gravity.  I also have no idea what the alcohol by volume is.

Bottles drying in dishwasher

Bottles drying in dishwasher

 

Transferring beer into bottling bucket

Transferring beer into bottling bucket

Look at that color

Look at that color

Got about 40 bottles out of it, about 15-20 22oz bottles and the rest small bottles.  Will be a nice drinkable beer.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.brettgorley.com/blog/?p=805

Logging the bubble frequency in your airlock

Leave it to a geek who loves beer to come up with this one.

One of the folks over at Hack-a-day created a device to measure the frequency of bubbles in his airlock by measuring the passage of air through the air lock.  They say the system breaks down during vigorous fermentation, but for later on in fermentation or in secondary fermentation this could tell you when your beer is close to being done.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.brettgorley.com/blog/?p=803

Autodesk DWG TrueView on Terminal Server

I was once tasked with installing Autodesk’s DWG TrueView in a Terminal Server environment.  Needless to say, it didn’t go well.  Autodesk designs everything to run in a stand alone user mode with full admin privileges.  So, to make this work, I found a website that had instructions that worked.  The original site has since removed that posting, but I was fortunate enough to pull it from Google’s cache (thanks, Google!)  I did exactly as this said and all users in my Terminal Server environment were able to use DWG TrueView.  However, those same users also needed full admin privileges on the server.  I have yet to tinker with permissions to get this to work with regular users, as my boss told me to just give ’em admin and then lock them down with Software Restriction Policies and Group Policies, but for those who need a starting point, here it is.

  1. Logon as an administrator to the Windows TS
  2. Install DWG TrueView 2012 accepting all default setup options
  3. After setup is complete, launch the DWG application and make sure it starts successfully without any errors. Then close the application
  4. Make sure the following 2 folders were created:
    1. C:\Documents and Settings\%username%\Local Settings\Application Data\Autodesk
      (or on Server 2008 C:\users\%username%\AppData\Local\Autodesk)
    2. %APPDATA%\Autodesk
      (Server 2008- C:\users\%username%\AppData\Roaming\Autodesk)
  5. Create a new folder called, for example, “DWGSHARE” on the local terminal server drive and grant the following NTFS permissions:
    1. Administrators – Full Control
    2. Authenticated Users –  Full control
    3. System – Full Control

    (Also create a “Temp” folder below the “DWGSHARE” folder

  6. Merge the 2 folders noted in section 4 above to one Autodesk folder ,and copy the New Autodesk folder to the DWGSHARE folder
  7. Delete the 2 folders from the user profile and from the redirected application data, if applicable
  8. Export the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Autodesk key using Regedit to a .reg file
  9. Edit the exported registry file with notepad , change and replace all values that point to
    C:\Documents and Settings\%username%\Local Settings\Application Data\Autodesk (or on Server 2008 C:\users\%username%\AppData\Local\Autodesk)
    AND %APPDATA%\Autodesk (see 4.B above) to the new “DWGSHARE” folder path

    (I did a replace on “Users\\administrator\\AppData\\Local” with “DWGSHARE” and “Users\\administrator\\AppData\\Roaming” with “DWGSHARE” )

  10. Also replace all instances of “C:\\Users\\administrator\\Documents\\” with “C:\\Users\\%username%\\Documents” within the registry file.
  11. Import the edited registry file ,start the application and make sure there are no errors, if so this means you are on the right path.
  12. Edit again the exported registry file and now replace the path from HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Autodesk to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Terminal Server\Install\Software\Autodesk
    (Note – this Registry key is actually the terminal server “install mode” key, each Registry key is automatically pushed to the Current User hive of each user logging on to the terminal server  )
  13. Import the file to registry, and make sure the following key  is replaced correctly and identical to exported file:  HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Terminal Server\Install\Software\Autodesk
  14. Logon to the server with a test user and try to launch the DWG application

Just replicated this today and all my terminal server users can use DWG TrueView now.  Did some more testing, and users don’t need to be local admins to run, they just need to be local admins the FIRST time they run it.  So, make them an admin, have them log in and run DWG, then log them out and set them back to normal users.

Permanent link to this article: http://www.brettgorley.com/blog/?p=790